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SuperDARN

The SuperDARN Research Group at Virginia Tech collaborates with an international community of scientists and engineers to study the interactions of the Earth's magnetosphere and upper atmosphere with the space environment.

    Fort Hays, KS Aerial

SuperDARN

The SuperDARN Research Group at Virginia Tech collaborates with an international community of scientists and engineers to study the interactions of the Earth's magnetosphere and upper atmosphere with the space environment.

    Fort Hays, KS Aerial

Heating the Space Environment

Virginia Tech researchers are involved in ionospheric modification experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Facility (HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska. Stimulated radiation from the ionosphere during heating by high power radio waves is utilized for diagnosing the space environment.

   

Heating the Space Environment

Ionosphere Predictions

Measurements in the solar wind are used to predict electric fields in the ionosphere and perturbations to the magnetic field on the ground. Empirical modeling of the ionosphere is done by Dr. Daniel Weimer in the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Science Team (MIST).

   

Ionosphere Predictions

Reaching for the Stars

The rocket in the inset was launched from Poker Flat Research Range during a beautiful aurora. The research team behind the launch is headed by Dr. Scott Bailey.

   

Aurora with Rocket Inset

Space Plasma Instrumentation

An instrumented sounding rocket ready for launch from Wallops Island to measure neutral winds and metallic ion layers in the midlatitude ionosphere.

   

Horizontal Rocket

Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Science Team (MIST)

The Magnetophere-Ionosphere Science Team (MIST) is a part of Space Physics Research Group at Virginia Tech. MIST is headed by Dr. Robert Clauer.

   

Plane

Center for Space Science and Engineering Research

Welcome to Space @ Virginia Tech

    Dr. Wayne A. Scales

The Center for Space Science and Engineering Research at Virginia Tech (Space@VT) currently has approximately fifty highly capable faculty, staff, and graduate students working in a broad spectrum of space science and engineering fields. The faculty are internationally renowned for their contributions and the students are amongst the best in the world. Fundamental investigations of the physics and chemistry of the near-earth space environment, the impact of this environment on modern technologies, and exploitation of this environment with modern technology serve as the core agenda of the group.  Both ground-based and space-based investigations are a focus of ongoing studies. Advanced computational modeling with high performance computing HPC resources are also critical to advancing the current agendas. Technological studies include spacecraft communication and navigation systems as well as spacecraft propulsion, dynamics and control. A vigorous research agenda, state-of-the-art laboratory facilities, broad academic training opportunities within the University, and a highly collegial environment make Space@VT an outstanding choice for graduate students as well as for research collaborations. Space@VT will continue to pursue the most talented individuals to advance the mission of the organization.

Dr. Wayne A. Scales
Professor and Director of Space @ Virginia Tech

News Highlights

AIM Mission Extended Through 2018

The Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) mission was extended through 2018. AIM is a NASA  satellite mission dedicated to the study of Polar Mesospheric Clouds – PMCs. The image shows several PMCs as viewed in the ultraviolet by AIM. The AIM Principal Investigator is Dr. James M. Russell of Hampton University. He is a VT/ECE graduate. Dr. Scott M. Bailey of Space@VT is Deputy PI. They lead an international team of researchers studying the AIM observations. AIM was launched in April of 2007.


PolarNOx Sounding Rocket Funded for January 2016 Flight

The Polar Night Nitric Oxide (PolarNOx) sounding rocket experiment was funded by NASA for flight in January of 2016. The image shows the same rocket experiment launching in February of 2011. PolarNOx uses stellar occultation to measure lower thermospheric nitric oxide during the polar night. It is led by Dr. Scott M. Bailey of Space@VT in collaboration with the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado, Artep Inc., and the Space Dynamics Laboratory at Utah State University.


Research Spotlight: Exploration of Under-Ice
Regions with Ocean Profiling Agents (EUROPA)

    EUROPA

 

EUROPA is an incredibly enticing target for exploration – the nearest reaches of what may be a vast new “habitable zone” of interior oceans warmed and stirred by tidal forces, read more.

News Archive

NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)

    NSF

NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU)


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